Augusta’s pink October aids cancer

Warren HatelyAugusta Margaret River Times
Celebrating in pink for charity are Ann Lyon, Carolyn Balding, Justine Balding, Pamela Marsh and Gailene Shore with (back row) Chrissie Mason-Walshaw and Jenny Bialosowski.
Camera IconCelebrating in pink for charity are Ann Lyon, Carolyn Balding, Justine Balding, Pamela Marsh and Gailene Shore with (back row) Chrissie Mason-Walshaw and Jenny Bialosowski.

Augusta will go it alone with its own celebration of all things pink next month.

The seaside southern hamlet will see a slew of local businesses and attractions adorned in pink in October for the McGrath Foundation and to give local traders a shot in the arm.

Community Resource Centre co-ordinator Jane O’Reilly told the Times Augusta was fully behind the cancer charity and wanted to do its own thing after last month’s widespread festivities in Busselton and the shire’s north.

Events at the Augusta Hotel, Leeuwin Lighthouse, a mini market, and other activities involving the art club and men’s shed will lure visitors and locals alike to the celebration.

“October is the national month for breast cancer awareness,” Ms O’Reilly said.

“Plus, it’s in school holiday time, so hopefully we can attract a few visitors to Augusta.

“The town will be pretty brightly done up in pink, plus we have a launch night, an auction night at the Augusta Hotel, a sundowner at the Leeuwin Lighthouse, and numerous other stuff going.”

The Augusta Men’s Shed and Augusta Art Club have also recently produced a big pink whale that will be on display right in the heart of the town.

The CRC will oversee the launch, with a screening of Pretty In Pink along with canapes and pink champagne, while the lighthouse will host a sundowner, and the hotel a charity auction.

Among the other offerings will be more pink scones than anyone could ever eat, children’s activities at the IGA supermarket, and mini-markets at the CWA Hall carpark on October 5, while local primary schools will also have a Dress Up In Pink day during the celebration.

Ms O’Reilly said Augusta took the McGrath Foundation fundraiser seriously because they understood it provided crucial funding for specialist nurses, who were not widely available in country towns.

“Breast cancer rates are higher in country areas than metropolitan, possibly due to distances people have to travel to get screened, although physical examinations are carried out by GPs,” she said.

“As one local lady told me, she was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 44 years.

“She had no family history of breast cancer, and following a routine examination by her doctor, she was sent off for further tests which confirmed she had cancer and would need a mastectomy.”

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