School once again among WA’s best

Taelor PeluseyAugusta Margaret River Times
Margaret River Senior High School turned in top results for the 2018 academic year.
Camera IconMargaret River Senior High School turned in top results for the 2018 academic year.

Margaret River Senior High School has once again ranked among WA’s top schools for academic achievement, marking the fifth time in eight years the school has cracked the coveted top 50.

Student performance rankings were released this week and also revealed MRSHS as the 14th-highest scoring public school in the State, including metropolitan areas.

Principal of 10 years Andrew Host said it was a significant achievement for the school and its students.

“We’re really pleased and proud to have had such a good year group,” he said. “We’re very lucky we have a really good community that values education, outstanding students and dedicated staff.”

About 50 per cent of students undertook ATAR studies, with the rest opting for the VET pathway.

Of the 126 graduates, 124 completed a Certificate II or above, or passed their ATAR exams.

Mr Host said it was a great result for students, and the “vast majority” were likely to be accepted to their first preference for university.

Graduates across the Capes region have typically taken a gap year to earn the required amount to qualify for Youth Allowance.

In 2017-18, that figure was $24,836. It was raised to $25,704 for this financial year.

Last year, the Times canvassed schools and learned up to 90 per cent of students were forced to take a gap year to be able to support themselves on relocating to the city.

Mr Host said MRSHS was bucking that trend for 2019, but was not sure why.

“We used to have about 10 per cent of people going straight to uni ... but this year it’s about 40-50 per cent,” he said.

“I don’t know for sure why — I think the students just want to get off to university sooner.”

Results showed MRSHS was one of just five regional schools to make the top 50 — four of which were located in the South West.

Those four, which included schools in Bunbury, Australind and Denmark, were also public schools.

“It’s a great indicator of success at public schools in the South West,” Mr Host said.

Get the latest news from thewest.com.au in your inbox.

Sign up for our emails